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Posts for: November, 2014

By JW Haltom DDS, Inc. Family Dentistry
November 19, 2014
Category: Oral Health
FiveFactsaboutGumDisease

The ailment we commonly called gum disease is actually series of related diseases, all of which involve the tissues that surround the teeth. It's sometimes thought of as a “silent” malady, because its symptoms — bad breath, soreness, or bleeding of the gums — may be masked by other conditions. Or, they may simply be disregarded.

But don't ignore these symptoms! Left untreated, periodontitis can have serious health consequences. Here are five things you should know about this disease.

Gum disease is a chronic inflammatory disease.

That means it's a disease related to a natural response of the body's immune system (inflammation), and it develops over time (chronic). Gingivitis, an inflammation of the gums, may be the first step in the disease's progression. Left untreated, it can be followed by destruction of the periodontal ligament (which helps hold the tooth in place), loss of the supporting bone, and ultimately tooth loss. But it doesn't stop there.

The effects of gum disease aren't confined to the mouth.

In fact, recent research has suggested a connection between periodontal disease and chronic diseases in the whole body. There is evidence that severe periodontal disease is linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (like heart attack and stroke), pregnancy complications, and other conditions. It is also believed to have an adverse effect on blood-sugar control in diabetics.

Gum disease is caused by the bacteria in dental plaque.

Oral bacteria tend to build up in a colony of living organisms called a biofilm. Of the many types of bacteria that live in the mouth, only a relatively few are harmful. When oral biofilms are not regularly disturbed by brushing and flossing, the disease-causing types tend to predominate. Once it gains a foothold, treating gum disease can become more difficult.

Prevention is the best defense.

Good personal oral hygiene, carried out on a daily basis, is probably the best defense against many forms of periodontal disease. Proper brushing and flossing is effective in disrupting the growth of dental plaques. Lifestyle changes — like quitting smoking and reducing stress — are also associated with lessening your chance of developing the disease. Genetics also seems to play a part, so those with a family history of periodontitis should pay special attention to preventive measures.

Prompt, effective treatment is critical.

Bleeding of the gums is never a normal occurrence. But sometimes this (and other symptoms of gum disease) may be overlooked. During routine dental checkups, we can detect the early signs of periodontal disease. We can then recommend an appropriate treatment, from routine scaling and root planing (a cleaning of the teeth) to other therapies. So, besides brushing and flossing regularly, don't neglect regular examinations — they're the best way to stop this disease before it becomes more serious.

If you have concerns about gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Understanding Gum (Periodontal) Disease” and “Warning Signs of Periodontal (Gum) Disease.”


By JW Haltom DDS, Inc. Family Dentistry
November 11, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
EvolutionsinTooth-ColoredFillings

Tooth-colored fillings are just one of the many ways that cosmetic dentistry has evolved over the past few decades. There was once a time where having a cavity treated meant that you would be left with a noticeable metal filling. However, today we have an array of tools and materials available that help make tooth repair more like creating a fine piece of art.

Tooth-colored fillings are made of composite resin, which is a mixture of plastic and glass. Composite resin is not only more aesthetically pleasing, but also better for your teeth than metal fillings. Metal fillings can require your dentist to remove healthy parts of your tooth to create a ledge (undercut) that locks the filling in place. Tooth-colored fillings do not need this undercut to stay in place. In fact, they physically attach, or bond, to natural tooth structure. The procedure is also very simple. We'll apply the composite resin directly to your teeth, sculpt it and then finally harden it with a special light. When you see the results, you will be amazed at how natural and lifelike the restoration appears.

Another advantage of tooth-colored fillings is that they are strong and flexible. When you bite or chew, they will absorb and transfer the forces, just like your natural teeth. Metal fillings are strong, but they are also stiff, which can stress your teeth and make them more susceptible to cracking.

During your examination, we will evaluate if tooth-colored fillings are the best tooth repair option. If your cavity is too large for composite resin, we may recommend a porcelain filling. This procedure may require two appointments: the porcelain filling will be crafted in a dental laboratory, and we will then place this filling at your next visit.

If you would like more information about tooth-colored fillings, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Natural Beauty of Tooth-Colored Fillings.”


By JW Haltom DDS, Inc. Family Dentistry
November 03, 2014
Category: Oral Health
BleedingGumsmaybeaWarningSignofGumDisease

If your gums bleed when you brush your teeth, it’s unlikely the cause is brushing too hard. The more common reason (especially if you’re experiencing little to no pain) is periodontal (gum) disease caused by the accumulation of bacterial deposits known as dental plaque and calculus where your teeth and gums meet.

This bacterial dental plaque results in an infection in the soft tissues of the gum; the body responds to this infection with antibodies, which in turn cause the gums to become swollen, or inflamed. As this biological “war” rages on, both the infection and inflammation become chronic. The tissues are weakened from this disease process and bleed easily.

Bleeding gums, then, is an important warning sign of possible gum disease. As the infection progresses the normal attachment between the teeth and gums begins to break down and form pockets in the void. The infection will continue within these pockets, eventually spreading deeper into the gums and bone. The gum tissue may begin to recede, resulting in bone loss and, if untreated, to tooth loss.

In the early stages of the disease, bleeding gums could be the only symptom you notice. It’s possible the bleeding may eventually stop, but this doesn’t mean the disease has, and is more likely advancing. If you’ve encountered bleeding gums, you should visit us as soon as possible for a complete examination.

There’s a two-pronged approach for treating gum disease. The first prong — and top priority — is to remove as much of the offending bacterial plaque and harder deposits (calculus) as possible, along with the possibility of follow-up antibacterial and antibiotic treatment. This may require more than one session, but it’s necessary in stopping the disease. The second prong is instituting proper oral hygiene: daily brushing and flossing (using proper techniques we can teach you) and semi-annual professional cleanings in our office to remove any plaque or calculus not removed with brushing.

Bleeding gums is your body’s way of telling you something isn’t right with your gums. The sooner you seek diagnosis and treatment, the better your chances of halting the damage caused by the disease.

If you would like more information on bleeding gums as a warning sign of gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.”