My Blog

Posts for: November, 2013

By JW Haltom DDS, Inc. Family Dentistry
November 26, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   mouthguards  
WhoNeedsaMouthguard
  1. What is a mouthguard? A mouthguard or mouth protector is a protective appliance that covers the teeth and gums to prevent or reduce injury to the teeth, gums, jaws, and lips during sports or other activities prone to injuries.
  2. Who should use a mouthguard? Children, adolescents or even adults who participate in contact or injury prone sports should use a mouthguard.
  3. What do you mean by contact sports? Mouthguards are used most commonly in sports such as boxing, football, hockey and lacrosse. The American Dental Association recommends protection for 27 different sports, including basketball, soccer, water polo, rugby and more. The governing bodies of football, boxing, ice hockey, men's lacrosse and women's field hockey require mouth protection. It's a good idea to use a mouthguard during any activity that could result in a blow to the face or mouth.
  4. What does the mouthguard protect against? A mouthguard protects against breaking or dislodging teeth or injuring jaws, gums, lips, or tongue, all injuries that can happen when you engage in contact or injury prone sports.
  5. What are my choices for mouthguards? The best choice is a custom-made mouthguard fitted and made by a dentist. Stock mouthguards that are one size fits all can be bought off-the-shelf in stores, but there is no guarantee of fit or protection. A third type is a “boil and bite” guard, in which the guard material is heated and then shaped by biting down on the softened material. This offers some attempt at fitting that is better than off-the-shelf, but not as good as a mouthguard that is designed specifically for you.
  6. Why is it better to get a mouthguard from our office than to buy one at a store? Studies have shown that store-bought stock or boil-and-bite mouthguards do not offer the same protection as a custom-made mouthguard. In our office we will make a mold of your mouth and design your mouthguard to fit your individual characteristics. It will be comfortable and easy to clean and will not restrict your speech or breathing. It will be made of resilient and tear-resistant materials, properly adapted for maximum protection, comfort and injury protection.

Wearing a properly fitted and properly used mouthguard prevents injuries to teeth, jaws, gums, lips, or tongue when you or your child participates in contact sports. Make an appointment with us to discuss your custom fitted mouthguard. To learn more read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Mouthguards.”


By JW Haltom DDS, Inc. Family Dentistry
November 18, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TakeCareofYourGumsandTheyWillTakeCareofYou

If your gums appear reddish, puffy and bleed easily — especially at the margins where they meet your teeth — instead of their normal pink, you have gingivitis (“gingiva” – gums; “itis” – inflammation). Gingivitis is one of the first signs of periodontal disease (“peri” – around; “odont” – tooth) that affects the tissues that attach to the teeth, the gums, periodontal ligament and bone. Other common symptoms of periodontal disease include bad breath and taste.

If periodontal (gum) disease is allowed to progress, one possible consequence is gum recession exposing the root surfaces of the teeth. This can cause sensitivity to temperature and touch. Another sign is that the gum tissues may start to separate from your teeth, causing pocket formation; this is detectable by your dentist or hygienist. As pocket formation progresses the bone supporting the teeth is destroyed leading to loose teeth and/or gum abscesses. Unchecked or untreated it leads to tooth loss.

Inflammation, a primary response to infection is actually your immune (resistance) system's way of mounting a defense against dental plaque, the film of bacteria that concentrates between your teeth and gums every day. If the bacteria are not removed, the inflammation and infection become chronic, which literally means, “frustrated healing.” Smoking is a risk factor for periodontal disease. Smokers collect plaque more quickly and have drier mouths, therefore, cutting down or quitting smoking can reduce the severity of gum disease. Stress has also been shown to affect the immune (resistance) system, so stress reduction practices can help here as well as in other parts of your life. Gum disease can also affect your general health especially if you have diabetes, cardiovascular or other systemic (general) diseases of an inflammatory nature.

Periodontal disease is easily preventable. The best way to stop the process is to remove each day's buildup of plaque by properly brushing and flossing your teeth. Effective daily dental hygiene has been demonstrated to be effective in stopping gingivitis. It sounds simple, but although most people think they're doing a good job, they may not be. Effective brushing and flossing requires demonstration and training. Come and see us for an evaluation of how well you're doing. Regular checkups and cleanings with our office are necessary to help prevent gingivitis and periodontal disease. In addition if you already have periodontal disease you may need a deep cleaning known as root planing or debridement to remove deposits of calcified plaque called calculus or tartar, along with bacterial toxins that have become ingrained into the root surfaces of your teeth.

Gum disease is often known as a silent disease because it doesn't hurt, so see our office for a periodontal exam today.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about gingivitis and periodontal disease. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Understanding Gum (Periodontal) Disease.”


By JW Haltom DDS, Inc. Family Dentistry
November 15, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
CompositeResinsCouldbetheAnswertoDamagedFrontTeeth

Our smiles are our “calling cards” for first impressions. When our front teeth are missing, chipped or otherwise damaged, it will certainly make an impression — and not a positive one.

The good news is many aesthetic problems with front teeth can be remedied with the use of composite resins. This cost-effective treatment choice not only minimizes a negative appearance, but can actually create a positive smile transformation.

Composite resins are tooth-colored materials made up of two or more polymer substances. We call materials like these biomimetic, meaning something non-living that’s fashioned to appear or “mimic” something living. Composite resins are made of substances that aren’t teeth, but fashioned to look and function like teeth.

Composite resin restorations are bonded to the outside of the tooth with dental adhesive, with little to no preparation of the enamel surface of the tooth. They’re best suited for teeth with minor to moderate damage from decay or trauma, but where the majority of the structure is still viable and intact.

These restorations require skill and an artistic eye to achieve the most life-like result. One of the most important considerations is tooth color. The natural color of your teeth is actually a combination of color from the inner core of the tooth, the dentin, and the outer enamel layer. Much of the color comes from the dentin as it shows through the translucence of the enamel. The intensity and hue also changes along the length of the tooth — there are subtle zones of color that run vertically along the length of the crown (the visible portion of the tooth). Our aim is to replicate this variety of color in the restoration and affix it in such a way that it blends with the natural color of surrounding teeth.

Composite resins aren’t the best option for all situations; depending on the tooth’s condition and location, a porcelain veneer may be the better choice. After a thorough dental examination, we can make the best recommendation for your situation. If conditions are right, a composite resin restoration could transform your smile and your life.

If you would like more information on front teeth repair options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth With Composite Resin.”


By JW Haltom DDS, Inc. Family Dentistry
November 07, 2013
Category: Oral Health
10FactsYouShouldKnowAboutToothDecay

If you have ever had tooth decay, you should know:

  1. Tooth decay is one of the most common of all diseases, second only to the common cold.
  2. Tooth decay affects more than one-fourth of U.S. children ages 2 to 5, half of those ages 12 to 15, and more than 90 percent of U.S. adults over age 40.
  3. Tooth decay causes pain, suffering and disability for millions of Americans each year — even more disturbing, tooth decay is preventable.
  4. If it is not treated, in extreme and rare cases tooth decay can be deadly. Infection in an upper back tooth can spread to the sinus behind the eye, from which it can enter the brain and cause death.
  5. Tooth decay is an infectious process caused by acid-producing bacteria. Your risk for decay can be assessed in our office with a simple test for specific bacterial activity.
  6. Three factors are necessary for tooth decay to occur: susceptible teeth, acid-producing bacteria and a diet rich in sugars and refined carbohydrates.
  7. Babies are not born with decay-causing bacteria in their mouths; the bacteria are transmitted through saliva from mothers, caregivers, or family members.
  8. Fluoride incorporated into the tooth structure protects teeth against decay by making the enamel more resistant to acid attack.
  9. Sealants, which close up the nooks and crannies in newly erupted teeth, stop bacterial collection where a toothbrush can't reach. Teeth with sealants have been shown to remain 99 percent cavity-free over six years.
  10. Restricting sugar intake is important in preventing tooth decay. Your total sugar intake should be less than 50 grams a day (about ten teaspoons) including sugars in other foods. A can of soda may have six teaspoons of sugar — or more!

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about tooth decay. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay – The World's Oldest & Most Widespread Disease.”